Plumbing Tips to Transition Your Home from Winter to Spring

Transitioning Your Home from Winter to Spring

Winter can be tough on your home, especially its plumbing system. Spring is the perfect time to check on the overall health of your home’s pipes, both to prevent long term damage and prepare them for Spring. Before you clean off the grill and put out the sprinklers, prepare your home’s plumbing for Spring with these simple guidelines.

Checking Indoor Plumbing

First, check your walls for any stains, water spots, or other signs of water damage. These can all indicate leaks somewhere within the pipes that run alongside the walls in your home. Open your cupboard underneath bathroom and kitchen sinks and run the faucet to check for leaks that could have been caused by pipes bursting during Winter months.

If you insulated exposed pipes to prep them for winter, remove the insulation to check your pipes for leaks. If you have a tank heater, drain it (or hire a professional plumber to do so) and clean out debris that may have accumulated within in it while the tank is empty.

Checking Outdoor Plumbing

Outdoor plumbing is especially vulnerable to freezing. Check your home’s plumbing by running your outdoor faucets (with a hose attached) several minutes. Inspect the walls and the ground surrounding your faucet and check for puddles or leaks. If there are signs of water or if the water pressure is weaker than it was during the previous year, you may have cracks or leaks within your pipes.

If you have a septic system, check the area surrounding it for soggy spots or puddles. Contact an expert if you find anything suggesting a leak in your septic system. A licensed plumber can pinpoint the leak and repair it before the problem becomes worse.

Preparing your home for each season is a sure way to not only take pride in home ownership, but to maintain your house and its components in top condition.If you find evidence that there is significant damage to your home’s plumbing, contact us. We’re happy to help you undo the damage that harsh Pittsburgh winters can do to your pipes.

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